Incident of the Year

Too often, the wildland fire community talks only about the lessons learned from mistakes rather than those learned from successes- so we decided to focus on success!

2016

Fresno Fire (Texas)

Big Bend National Park managed the lightning ignited Fresno Fire in June 2016. The Fresno Fire was recognized for efforts to safely maximize beneficial fire. Management decisions were based on science and the desire to reintroduce fire to a fire-dependent landscape. Pre-planning and collaboration among park fire and resource staff allowed management of this fire for resource objectives, such as restoration of a historically overgrazed arid grassland.

*The nomination form for the 2017 Season will be available this summer. Think about how science is used to make decisions during wildfires as well as the level of collaboration among resource and fire staff… Feel free to form a group (for example: ops, PIO, resource staff…) to complete the nomination form!


2015

Whitetail and Sawmill Fires (Arizona)

Whitetail and Sawmill firesThe San Carlos Apache Tribe and the BIA San Carlos Agency teamed up to manage these fires simultaneously during the 2015 season. The Southwest Fire Science Consortium board chose to recognize these fires due to the efforts to safely maximize beneficial fire. Management decisions were based on science and the desire to build a mosaic of fire on the landscape capable of long-term resilience. Congratulations on a job well done!

 


2014

Two fires from the 2014 season were recognized by the Southwest Fire Science Consortium Executive Board for progressive management tactics and strategies used to apply beneficial fire to the landscape under difficult conditions. Awards were presented March 31, 2015 at the Southwest Incident Management Team meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

PINO FIRE (New Mexico)

Lightning Ignited, Multiple Objectives

Beneficial fire was safely maximized on the landscape under challenging conditions. The fire’s proximity to neighborhoods and the potential risk involved increased the complexity of this fire. Smoke impacts to nearby cities made the decision to choose resource benefit a difficult one.

 

SLIDE FIRE (Arizona)

Human Ignited, Suppression Objectives

Beneficial fire was safely maximized on the landscape while maintaining suppression objectives. The decision to conduct nighttime burnouts allowed for in season burning that was overall ecologically beneficial and reduced fire hazard for neighboring communities.

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